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Featured Articles

January 17, 2019

Oral, Gut Decontamination Does Not Reduce Bloodstream Infections in ICU

Results of a randomized clinical trial showed that selective oral or digestive tract decontamination is not associated with reductions in ICU-acquired bloodstream infections caused by multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria among patients receiving mechanical ventilation with moderate to high antibiotic resistance prevalence. Read More

New Study Compares Performance of Real-Time Infectious Disease Forecasting Models

In what the authors believe is the first documented comparison of several real-time infectious disease forecasting models by different teams across many seasons, five research groups report this week that a majority of models consistently showed higher accuracy than historical baseline models. Read More

New AI Can Detect Urinary Tract Infections

New AI developed at the University of Surrey could identify and help reduce one of the top causes of hospitalisation for people living with dementia: urinary tract infections (UTI). UTI is an infection of any part of the urinary system, from the kidneys to the bladder. The symptoms include pain in the lower part of the stomach, blood in urine, needing to urinate suddenly or more often than usual and changes in mood and behaviour. Read More

CDC: Flu Cases Hit 7 Million in the United States

The flu season is picking up steam, with about 7 million Americans having been struck by a strain of the flu virus, health officials said Friday. Almost half of those individuals went to a doctor, while 69,000 to 84,000 people have been hospitalized for flu-related illness, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in a new release. As of Jan. 5, 15 states and New York City were reporting high flu activity, and it was widespread in 30 states. The influenza A strain H1N1 remains the most common type of flu. This strain has been circulating and was pandemic in 2009 and in 1918. Read More