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Featured Articles

April 18, 2019

Antibiotics Unnecessary in Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci Catheter-Related BSI

Study findings indicated that withholding antimicrobial therapy in CoNS-CRBSI is neither associated with short-term complications nor with long-term recurrences. Patients not receiving antibiotics for catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) with coagulase-negative Staphylococci (CoNS) after catheter removal experience similar short-term complications and long-term recurrences to patients receiving ≥5 days of antibiotic therapy, according study results published in Antimicrobial Resistance & Infection Control. Read More

ICU Patients with Non-Brain-Related Injuries May Suffer Undetected Cognitive Dysfunction

Many patients spend time in the ICU for reasons that have nothing to do with a known brain injury, and most health care providers and caregivers don't have any evidence to believe there is an issue with the brain. For example, a patient may have had a traumatic injury that does not involve the brain, yet still requires breathing support to enable surgeons to fix damaged organs, they may have issues with their heart or lungs, they may contract a serious infection, or they may simply be recovering from a surgical procedure like an organ transplant that has nothing directly to do with their brain. Read More

Study Provides Insight Into Use of Critical Care Resources

A study by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators has found wide variation in the use of different hospital units—intensive care or general medical units—to deliver a type of advanced respiratory support called non-invasive ventilation. The team's report published in Critical Care Medicine found no differences in length of stay or in-hospital deaths among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) receiving this treatment that were associated with whether they were treated on a general medical unit or an intensive care unit (ICU). Read More

Study Says Hospital Acquired Infections Can Make Patients ‘Feel Like Lepers’

Healthcare associated infections such as MRSA cause more than just physical distress for patients, according to a recent analysis. The study, published in the American Journal of Infection Control, a journal of the Association of Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, found many patients had emotional responses to diagnoses of hospital acquired infections, including “feeling dirty,” “having the plague” or “feeling like a leper.” Researchers at Glasgow Caledonian University in Scotland conducted a meta-synthesis of qualitative research, according to a news release on the study. Read More